Get the Most out of Your Honeymoon

Get the Most out of Your Honeymoon

The problem with honeymoon planning is that a honeymoon comes after a wedding–you know, that gigantic event that took all of your planning energy already. The point of a honeymoon is to take a deep breath and relax with your new spouse after all that wedding craziness. However, great vacations don’t just happen by themselves. Even if you plan to get pampered at an all-inclusive resort, you’ll still need to do a little bit of prep work to make sure you get the most out of your honeymoon. Here’s how.

Comfortable Clothes

Of course you want to look good on your honeymoon. You have to show your new spouse how lucky they are to have landed such a hottie, after all. But comfort is the key. If you squeezed your feet into a pair of gorgeous, pinching heels for your wedding ceremony, now’s the time to kick them off and leave them at home. Pack the flip-flops and breathable fabrics (unless you’re honeymooning in a mountaintop cabin, that is. Then, pack your fuzziest slippers!). If you plan on going sightseeing by foot, don’t forget comfy hiking shoes. 

Even if you want to dress up for dinner, there’s no reason to compromise comfort. Leave overly tight or stiff formalwear at home, and only bring the wardrobe pieces that make you feel as great as you look. If you’re focused on pulling up your dress straps or turning your head slowly so your oversize earrings don’t smack into your cheeks, you’ll have less energy to spare for what’s really important: paying attention to how wonderful your married life is so far!

That’s not to say that you shouldn’t look your best when you leave for your honeymoon. After all, honeymoons are times for romance. But when you get to your honeymoon suite, make sure you mean it when you say, “I’m going to slip into something a little more comfortable.” 

Romantic Music

When you want to get into a romantic mood, nothing sets a scene like the right music. Pick out a few of your favorite playlists ahead of time so you can put on the right tunes at the right moment. If you’re honeymooning somewhere remote and relying on a portable music playing device, don’t forget to bring two pairs of headphones! (Although sharing one pair can help you snuggle that much more closely while overlooking a picturesque sunset.) 

While it’s important to make sure your favorite romantic songs make the cut, it’s also essential to choose songs with personal value. Think about the songs that were playing during landmark moments in your relationship, like your first date, first kiss, or first dance. Feel free to add in a few songs that remind you of your new spouse, as well. Even if your partner hasn’t heard some of the songs before, playing them while talking about the reasons you chose them could lead to some memorable romance.

No Expectations

Ditching your expectations isn’t about steeling yourself for a terrible honeymoon. In fact, it’s the opposite. Departing for your first vacation as a married couple is about discovering new experiences together. Part of that discovery involves leaving yourself open to adventure. Even if you think you know exactly what to expect from your honeymoon (say, waking up every day at your five-star hotel, getting a professional massage, grabbing a drink in a coconut shell, and heading down to the beach until dinner), it’s still important to leave a little room for spontaneity.

After all, what happens if you and your newlywed spouse decide to try a karaoke bar one night? There’s never a better time to ditch the regimented calendar and go with the flow than when you’re already embarking on a completely new stage of your life. 

Don’t be afraid to take new opportunities as they come. (Backstage zoo tour? Coconut shucking class? Why not?) Even if something isn’t your favorite experience at the time, it might just become your favorite “crazy honeymoon story” later. Of all the most important things to bring with you on your honeymoon, your sense of humor is essential.

After all, traveling together is a lot like going through life together: if you can get along well while things are going wrong, you’ll be twice as strong together when things are going right.